Tag Archives: Handiquilter

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Longarm Quilting Ulla’s Quilt

At some point in August I was cruising Instagram and a German quilter I’d recently followed posted a gorgeous quilt top she’d just completed. In terms of design, the quilt was really simple – six solid horizontal stripes stretching across the left third of the quilt, in purple, blue, green, red, orange, and yellow, and the rest of it all white – but my god, it took my breath away! Without thinking twice I asked if I could quilt it, and for some reason she said yes and told me I could do whatever I wanted to! That is one trusting stranger, y’all. When she asked for the cost I said that I would do it for free for the practice, with the caveat that she gets what she paid for. Or at least that’s what I tried to explain in my rather pathetic German.

Ulla sent me the quilt with a whole bunch of goodies (including a bit of cash), and I held off until I returned from France to get started, hoping to get some ideas and inspiration while I was there. I had a pretty good idea about what to do with the stripes, but I agonized over all that negative space. In the end I decided to just load it on the frame and get on with it.

I decided to go with a bar graph design, extending each stripe into the negative space with a different-length frame. Each stripe then got a different quilting pattern, extending into the framed part of the negative space. This was a good opportunity to practice some ruler work.

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Extending the bars and filling them in.

Once the stripes where completed, I tackled the negative space. At first, I considered breaking it into smaller segments, but then I decided it was too much work and that I should just start filling in the white space with whatever struck my fancy. This was something we practiced in the Shape-by-Shape class with Angela Walters, but it’s also something I’d been practicing on paper for the better part of two years.

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I love how the tear drops pop here.

I’d started doodling when I first decided I was going to get a longarm and much like with the longarm, I was TERRIBLE at this at first. But then I started doing it every day—on the commute to and from work, while sitting in the English Garden at lunch, or whenever I sat on my own in a café. I got better paper and better pens, and I started getting pretty damn good at it.

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An early doodle.

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A later doodle

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Starting to look familiar?

A lot of these shapes were also inspired by Graffiti Quilting by Karlee Porter, whose quilting style I absolutely adore.

So back to the quilt, I just started filling it in and stopped when I was done! There were pebbles, paisleys, ribbon candies, flowers, and all sorts of random shapes that I used to doodle or that just popped into my head as I quilted. Some worked great, some not so much, but with so much quilting, no one was going to notice what didn’t work.

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Doodling with thread.

I also incorporated some of the designs I learned from Angela, including the swirl chain and the bracketed frame. I relied on the the biggest (non-)secret she taught us:

Echo, echo, echo!

I echoed the crap out of this quilt ;).

All told this quilt took about 6-8 hours to quilt. Had I charged for it, we’d be looking at hundreds of euros, though I don’t look at it as money lost, but rather as valuable lessons learned. On this quilt I got to practice lots of quilting patterns and ruler work, learned to deal with tension issues, tried out different kinds of thread, used red snappers for the first time instead of pinning, learned how to remove blood from a pure white quilt (true story), and learned lots of other things.

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I love the way the back turned out!

I also learned that I’m ready to start charging customers market prices for quilting, so if you’re in Germany or Europe and need some longarm quilting done, get in touch!

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Backgrounds and Borders Class with Angela Walters

In the second class with Angela Walters, we tackled borders and backgrounds. Angela also offers this as a Craftsy class. We started with a wavy line design that could be used as is or could be modified to add more interest, for example, a ribbon candy or wishbone filler.

Most everyone can quilt a wavy line. If you can’t, draw a straight line and it will probably turn out wavy.

Wavy border with filler variations.

Wavy border with filler variations.

In addition to the variations to the pattern itself, Angela also demonstrated how to tackle the corner in a border design, either by changing the scale, changing the angle, or using a different design altogether in the corner. On the point of scale, this design (like most border designs) can be used as an overall filler through a change of scale.

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Wavy lines with no filler at the top, and filled in with a wishbone below.

I just spent ten minutes talking about a wavy line. It’s a skill.

Confession: I didn’t love this pattern, but as Angela pointed out in the Shape-by-Shape class, if you have a design that isn’t working, think what to change to make it work. So having thought about it, this shape could work really well with a curved, cathedral-shaped line, or with a curved, pointy line. I played around with such variations when I attended this class the second time.

Making the pattern work.

Making the pattern work for me.

The next design was a wavy filler, a fairly straightforward design using a curvy line. You start by drawing a curvy line across the quilt, followed by a curvy line in the other direction that meets up with the first line at some point and then turns back. You continue to draw these wavy lines to meet up and go back at various points. The overall effect is very pretty and a multitude of lines hides a multitude of sins.

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Wavy lines

As a variation, the curvy lines can be used to create slightly larger “pods,” which can then be filled with a secondary pattern such as ribbon candy or pebbles. Another variation is to  introduce a wood-grain pattern here and there.

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This is a slight variation on the pattern, but illustrates the pods well.

Next, we tackled the swirl chain.

J’adore swirls.

The swirl chain is SUCH a versatile pattern. It can be used in a border or as a background, depending on scale and direction. The pattern starts out with an elongated, downward-facing swirl that is echoed a few times, and continues with an elongated, upward-facing swirl that is also echoed. The trick is to always finish the swirl echo in the “V” shape that forms between the opposite-facing swirls, and then to curve either over the upward-facing swirl or below the downward-facing swirl before starting the next swirl, to maintain a continuous line of quilting. When you reach a corner, the next swirl should go at a 90-degree angle from the last “V” to fit the next line.

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LOVE THIS PATTERN

The V is where you need to be!

Referencing back to another point Angela made in the Shape-by-Shape class, rather than quilting the entire border and then filling in the quilt, which can lead to warping, it is best to quilt the border in the available throat space of the longarm, then to fill in the centre of the quilt, and only then to roll the quilt and to again do the borders and filler, and so on. When demonstrating swirl chain, she showed exactly how to “enter” the quilt from the border and how to return to the border – it’s always the V! End the swirl at a V facing towards the edge of the quilt, use the filler design (e.g., straight lines, small swirls, feathers, leaves, etc.) to fill in around the outer edge of the swirl design, return to the V where you started filling in, echo it to the opposite V, and then begin filling in the other side of the border. Since you’re facing the centre of the quilt while doing this, you can now start quilting the centre. This is illustrated in the sketch above.

The secret to this design is no secret: echo, echo, echo!

Angela showed us how the quilting around this pattern makes a very big difference in terms of how much the design stands out or blends in. By framing the swirls with tightly quilted parallel lines perpendicular to the swirls, the swirls pop right out. Quilt the lines more widely apart, at about the same scale as the echoes on the swirl, and suddenly the swirls don’t stand out so much. To really make the swirl chain blend in, surround it with smaller-scale swirls. The sample Angela brought with her demonstrated these differences beautifully—a tiny change makes a huge difference in how a quilting pattern can look!

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See how the tight quilting at the bottom of the swirl chain totally makes it pop out, while the lines above make it blend in?

When using this design as a filler, the next elongated swirl can go any which way, but the trick is still to always end up in the V before heading out into the next swirl. You can also add a tear-drop shape in the V for a bit interest before continuing with the next swirl.

I’m working on a quilt right now where I’ve been playing with the swirl chain and it’s such a fun pattern.

The next border design was a herringbone design (you can see it in the picture above, in the blue section above the swirl chain). This design. is. gorgeous. It is subtle enough that doesn’t draw attention away from the centre of the quilt. To quilt it, quilt a rectangle in the border, then fill it with diagonal lines from the starting corner to the opposite corner. From there, leave a small gap and quilt the next rectangle, with the diagonal lines going in the other direction.

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Swoon!

The rectangles can be narrow or wide, or can match the width of the blocks or the sashings in the quilt centre. The gap between the rectangles is optional, and the lines don’t have to be diagonal, though I find the diagonal lines quite striking. For example, you could fill the rectangles with straight lines, alternating between horizontal and vertical lines, or you could use a wishbone pattern to fill them in. If you leave a gap between the rectangle, you can fill it with vertical lines. The rectangles can also be of different widths to add a bit of interest.

There are a couple of ways to approach the corner. You can continue the rectangles to the edge of the quilt, and then when it’s time to go down the side of the quilt, simply change the direction. Alternatively, as you approach the corner, start reducing the width of the rectangles a little, making them slightly (but not noticeably) narrower, so that you reach the corner with your last rectangle aligning with the inner edge of the perpendicular border. From here, you can leave the corner unquilted and start with a new rectangle down the side of the border, or you can fill in the corner with a different design, or simply fill it in with a square rather than a rectangle.

On a quilt with equally sized blocks and sashing, use the quilting in the border to echo—or extend—the shape of the block. In the sketch below, the purple patterns represent the quiting that would extend the shape of the block into the border. I don’t have a good picture of this but it’s a technique Angela uses frequently.

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This sketch doesn’t really explain this well.

The next design was back-and-forth lines. A simple filler in which scale can make a big difference. To quilt it, start at the edge of the quilt with  a straight line, an inch or two wide, and then curve back to echo it. As you approach the edge of the quilt, curve and echo again, this time making the line a little shorter or longer than the original line. Continue going back and forth and when you reach the bottom of the throat space, do the same quilting back up towards the top of the quilt, with the lines curving in the other direction just before they meet the original set of curves. Although this design requires quilting in columns up and down the quilt, varying the line lengths will eliminate the appearnce of actual columns.

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Back-and-forth lines.

To make sure that you get a round edge of the curve, don’t wait to hit the turning point and then to turn the machine; rather, start the curve AS you approach the turning point.

For variations, you can change the scale of this pattern, by making the distance between the lines a little bigger. You can also use straight rather than curved edges.

To make any aspect of the quilt stand out—quilt small.

I don’t see myself using this pattern as an overall design, but I definitely see using it to make another design stand out, like the echo swirl, or like the bracket design from Shape-by-Shape, which I recently tried. It… needs practice, or at the very least, matching thread ;).

There is always a solution and it is never to rip out the quilting.

Amen.

The last pattern we tackled was a paisley feather filler. This one is fairly straightforward: Start with an elongated swirl, then quilt a paisley design around it that resembles a feather and echo it. This is another shape where scale makes a big difference. Quilt a big swirl and small paisley feathers, or keep the paisley feathers at the same scale.

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I do this better with thread than with pen.

I love feathers. I think you should love them as much as I do.

Not sure I love them, but the paisley and the echoing make them a lot more palatable.

I really loved this class. In addition to learning some really interesting patterns, it showed me how scaling a pattern can make a huge difference to the overall look, and how easy it is to make a pattern pop out to make it a feature, or stay hidden to nicely complement the piecing. I’ve already used some of these patterns since the class and I’m really looking forward to trying the others out.

In the next post I’ll talk about the Little Changes, Big Variety class.

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The 22nd European Patchwork Meeting

Last year I went to the European Patchwork Meeting in the Val D’Argent in Alsace, France, to buy my longarm. I wanted to take at least one more longarm class before agreeing to plop down all my savings on one and this was the nearest show to me (about a five-hour drive). I knew nothing about the quilt show so I travelled with very few expectations. My only experiences of major quilt shows to date had been the Festival of Quilts in Birmingham. You guys, I know that Festival is supposed to be a big deal, but it looks like a show at the local rec centre compared to what goes on in Val D’Argent.

In addition to the vendor area, which is large but not massive (I’d say equivalent to Festival), there are close to twenty exhibitions spread out across four villages in the valley. There are about a dozen exhibitions in the main village, Ste. Marie-aux-Mines, and two or three in each of the other three villages, and these exhibitions are nothing less than spectacular. I was already blown away last year, but this year was even better.

I spent a week in the valley and saw nearly all of the exhibitions (there’s a free shuttle bus between the villages), some two or three times. One of my favourite exhibitions was one put on by Handiquilter (shocker!)(I swear I don’t work for them.)(Yet.). Handiquilter’s Director of Marketing collects old quilt tops and as a special project had some of the top longarm educators quilt them with contemporary quilting. The results are incredible. The exhibition had about ten quilts on display, but the full collection has closer to fifty. This was the first time any of the quilts have been exhibited and I’m really intrigued about what I haven’t seen yet.

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I think this is an Irish chain. I love it so much!

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I’m sure this pattern has a name but I don’t know what it is.

Every year the show puts on a themed competition and this year’s theme was “Colour.” Y’all, these quilts were amazing. I was (and continue to be) blown away by this quilt by Linda Kemshall. There’s so much going on here and it’s all so good.

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Is it not just?

The organizers liked this next quilt from the colour competition enough to put it on the poster for next year’s show. It’s by Gabrielle Paquin of France. It’s lovely.

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There’s a full gallery of this competition here.

The SAQA exhibition also had some absolute winners. This one kept me coming back for more and was conveniently located right next to the Handiquilter classroom. It’s done using a quilt-as-you-go method.

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A Zero 4 quilt by Annemarie Kowach of France

This next one is by Erica Waaser, who is Munich-based quilter (I think I read somewhere that she’s an architecht by training). Last year she had a stunning solo exhibition at the show and I was delighted to chat with her this year. She’ll be holding an exhibition in my LQS in Munich next summer and I asked her if she’d come to our guild meeting that month (conveniently held in the LQS gallery) and walk us through her quilts and her process, which she said she would! Yay!

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That’s Erica Waaser next to her beautiful quilt

But the true star of the show? Angela Walters. Every year Handiquilter brings one of its educators to give classes at the show and a little bird accidentally spilled the beans last year that Angela Walters would be this year’s teacher. I’d kept my mouth shut about it since it wasn’t meant to be common knowledge, but spent the past year bouncing up and down in anticipation. When the schedule was released she was scheduled to teach three classes, twice each, and I signed up for each and every one of them. The class prices were laughable. I paid 240 euro for what was scheduled to be 18 hours of tuition but ended up being more like 20. I don’t remember what I’m paying for a single, six-hour class at QuiltCon, but it’s easily half that. And you know what? I would have paid twice and three times that had I known what I would be getting. The entire experience was so incredible that I’ve been walking on air since. It’s made me completely zen about some ongoing life irritants and completely optimistic about the future.

I’ll get into more detail about the classes I took and the lessons I learned in the next few posts, but let me leave you with this “Angelism”:

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I’ll talk about the classes in detail in the next few posts. Consider signing up for my newsletter if you don’t want to miss out on these posts. To sign up, refresh the post and fill in your email address when the Hello Bar pops up.

The truth about longarming: Part 2

I ended my last post about longarming with the rather vague promise to set myself specific longarming goals, and though I didn’t articulate them, I was following them.

My first goal was to longarm a bobbin a day, which I did for a full week after the post. I had no specific plan, just to hit start and see where the machine took me. Well, it wasn’t great, but it was a start so I just kept going until that first bobbin ran out.

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But as I kept going, things started to even out a little.

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And I was really having fun.

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I’m not sure when I switched bobbins, but I just kept quilting a little bit every day after work.

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I experimented with new shape, different scales, and no matter what, just kept going.

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And at the end of the week I had this. If you zoom in on each part, there are lots of imperfections, but goodness, doesn’t it look pretty awesome? I was really pleased with it. The next shot shows a bit more detail. I especially like the top left corner. Although I know stitching at this scale takes forever and makes the quilt quite stiff, I’m really drawn to the teeny tiny quilting. I do need to practice working at a larger scale for customer quilts, so that’s the next goal.

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I was so happy with the results of the bobbin-a-day experiment that I decided it was time to load up a real quilt onto the frame. More on this customer quilt in another post.

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I Made A Wee Purchase

Last month I hit the road towards Alsace, France, to attend the European Patchwork Meeting. I wasn’t really sure what to expect, but it didn’t really matter all that much because I was going there to buy stuff: I was going to pick up a roll of batting I’d ordered from a vendor in the Netherlands, from whom I bought a roll at Nadelwelt in Karlsruhe in mid-2014, and I was going TO BUY A HANDIQUILTER longarm machine. You know, NO BIGGIE.

(More on the show in a separate post. It was mind blowing.)

I fell in love with the Avante when I took a class in Karlsruhe, but nearly fell off my chair when I heard how much it costs. Obviously I wasn’t going to spend nine thousand euro on a sewing machine. That’s CRAZY talk. But I think deep down I knew that I would. Not right away, certainly, but one day. So I started saving my pennies. When I visited Toronto in the fall of 2014 I went to a quilt show with my mom and played with the machine a bit more (I kept circling around and having a go, then running away when the salespeople approached). After I returned home, my parents, who at the best of times don’t have two pennies to rub together, offered me use of their credit line to buy it, which was incredibly generous, but I couldn’t take on that much debt, and certainly not when it’s secured against my parents’ house. (I come from good people, y’all.)

By the beginning of 2015 I’d managed to save about three thousand euro, and then my 40th birthday came around in February with a massive surprise of parents and friends turning up from Canada, the US, and England. My parents hit up the entire family for my longarm fund and suddenly nine thousand euro didn’t seem so nuts—I was more than halfway there! So I embarked on a major austerity program. I started packing my lunch, jacked up my monthly savings to the point where I was just barely managing to put gas in my car, saved all my fivers (do you save your coins? Don’t. Save your fivers. You’re welcome).

The math added up. I would have the cash on hand by the time the European Patchwork Meeting in September rolled around. Except then I found out that the price had gone up by another fifteen hundred euro (except it didn’t. It actually went up by twenty three hundred, as it would transpire when it came time to buy it). I hemmed, I hawed. I considered waiting until the new year because I’d have a few more months to save and my thirteenth salary would come in, but then the Germ said—just buy it. I’ll lend you the money.

So I did! I did a class at the show and then went over to the Handiquilter booth and told the man: Sell me a Handiquilter, Nate! (Nate, happens to be Handiquilter’s Director of Global Business Development. You know, NO BIGGIE.)

So he did! I bought one of the machines that was used in the class (brand new except for the classes at the show) for ten thousand euro, and with it comes massive box of thread and two-days’ private tuition by a Handiquilter educator in my house.

It was delivered at the beginning of October and my trainer, Patricia, will be here in mid-November to teach me everything I need to know. I’ve played with it a bit so far and I’m here to tell you that I am absolutely TERRIBLE at it, but not at all deterred.

Also, did I mention I am poor? A poor but delighted bunny.